Configure an SD card using kvmlib

  • September 19, 2018
  • Magnus Carlsson

This is the final post in a 4-part series about configuring and reading logged data using a Kvaser Memorator 2nd Generation device through kvmlib:

Earlier we interacted with kvmlib to configure a device and to retrieve both the configuration and logged data for further analysis. Now we will look at what steps that need to be performed differently if we only have access to the SD card that will be inserted into the device. The scenario is where the SD card is shipped between the physical logging location and us.

For the purpose of this exercise, we will take a 16 GB SD card that has been formatted in Windows, initialize and configure this SD card so that we later can insert the SD card into our Kvaser Memorator Pro 2xHS (EAN 00819-9), which is running firmware version 3.11. After running our logging session, we will remove the SD card from the device, read and reset the log files.

4.1 Initialize SD card

If we do not have our device at hand, we can still initialize the SD card using our Windows computer and the mhydraformat.exe program. This will however be more time consuming than using the device, as initializing a 16 GB card takes approximately 3 minutes.

The mhydraformat.exe program can be found in the installation directory of Kvaser Memorator Config Tool.1 You can run the formatting program with the --help argument to see the usage help text.

[C:\]mhydraformat.exe --help
Disk formatting program for Kvaser Memorator (2nd generation) devices.

-h       --help            | Print this information.
-d=DRIVE --drive=DRIVE     | The drive to format, e.g. F:
-r=X     --reserve=X       | The number of MB to reserve for user files.
-c=X     --config=X        | The number of MB to reserve for configurations.
         --fat16           | Format the disk with FAT16. Default is FAT32.
-i       --interactive     | Require the user to confirm before format.
-q       --quiet           | Stop all outputs. Overrides -i.
         --bin5            | Use the older, smaller version 5 of PARAM.LIF.
         --lio3            | Use the older LIO data format 3 for KMF files.

Example:
         mhydraformat -d=F: -r=100 -c=10 --interactive

Connect your SD card to the computer and note the drive letter. For me, the SD card was assigned to J:. We now run mhydraformat.exe to initialize the card. Note that the command line switch to specify the space to be allocated to DATABASE.BIN is here named --config. We also take a look at the contents of the card after the initialization using the Windows dir command.

C:> mhydraformat.exe -d=J: -r=10000 -c=10
Formatting...done.

C:> dir j:

 Volume in drive J has no label.
 Directory of  J:\

2018-08-10  10:39      10 010 624  DATABASE.BIN
2018-08-10  10:39   1 073 741 824  LOG00000.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39   1 073 741 824  LOG00001.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39   1 073 741 824  LOG00002.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39   1 073 741 824  LOG00003.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39   1 073 741 824  LOG00004.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39     514 785 280  LOG00005.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39      10 485 760  PARAM.LIF
               8 File(s)  5 903 990 784 bytes
               0 Dir(s)  10 004 455 424 bytes free

Here we see the binary configuration file (PARAM.LIF), the log file container (LOG00000.KMF through LOG00005.KMF) and the configuration file reserved for Kvaser Memorator Config Tool (10 MB DATABASE.BIN). We also see 10000 MB of free space as we requested.

4.2 Save configuration to disk

To download the configuration directly to the SD card, we need to open the file system instead of the device as we did in the previous posts. We also need to inform kvmlib about where our SD card was mounted. This is done by calling the function kmfOpen() and supply the full path to the file LOG00000.KMF, which always exists on a correctly initialized SD card.2

We are now also using kvaMemoLibXml to write the binary configuration file directly to the SD card.

As previously stated we also need to supply the correct device type.

# 12_configureSd.py
from canlib import kvamemolibxml

print('kvamemolib version: ', kvamemolibxml.dllversion())

# Our SD card is mounted under J:, so that is where our
# binary configuration should be placed.
filename = 'J:/PARAM.LIF'

# Convert the previously validated XML configuration file
# and write the resulting binary configuration to SD card
kvamemolibxml.kvaXmlToFile("config.xml", filename)

Listing 15: Writing binary configuration to SD card.

To download the configuration in clear text, we do just like we did in the previous post, but write the zip file to the SD card directly through the Windows mount point.

# 13_copy_files_to_card.py
import zipfile

# Our SD card is mounted under J:
filename = 'J:/config.zip'

# Creating zip archive
with zipfile.ZipFile(filename, mode='w',
                     compression=zipfile.ZIP_DEFLATED) as zipf:
    # Adding files to zip archive
    zipf.write('config.xml')
    zipf.write('myCanGenerator.txe')

Listing 16: Writing clear text configurations using a zip archive.

If we now look at the contents of our SD card we have the following.

C:>dir J:
 Volume in drive J has no label.
 Directory of J:\

2018-08-10  11:16            40 604 PARAM.LIF
2018-08-10  10:39     1 073 741 824 LOG00000.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39     1 073 741 824 LOG00001.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39     1 073 741 824 LOG00002.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39     1 073 741 824 LOG00003.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39     1 073 741 824 LOG00004.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39       514 785 280 LOG00005.KMF
2018-08-10  10:39        10 010 624 DATABASE.BIN
2018-08-10  11:21             2 516 config.zip
               9 File(s)  5 893 548 144 bytes
               0 Dir(s)  10 014 892 032 bytes free

4.3 Read result from SD card

When we get the SD card back from the field, we reconnect the SD card to our computer and begin by verifying the LIO data format version on the SD card.

# 14_verifyLioFormatSd.py
from canlib import kvmlib

# Our SD card is mounted under J:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = 'J:/LOG00000.KMF'

# Open the SD card and read LIO data format version
# We have firmware version 3.0 in the device this SD card will
# be inserted into, this means that the FW is using Lio Data
# Format v5.0 and we should use kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT as
# the deviceType
with kvmlib.openKmf(
        filename,
        device_type=kvmlib.Device.MHYDRA_EXT) as kmf:
    ldf_version = kmf.log.ldf_version

print('Lio Data Format version:', ldf_version)

# Verify that the LIO data format version of the card corresponds
# to the device type we used when opening the device
if ldf_version != (5, 0):
    print('Unexpected Lio Data Format:', ldf_version)
    if ldf_version == (3, 0):
        print("This log file can be read if you reopen the"
              " device as kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA.")

Listing 17: Verify LIO data format on SD card.

The next step is to read out the logged data. The only difference from our previous post using a connected device is opening the SD card instead of the device. Go back to the previous post for a more detailed description of what happens here.

# 15_readResultFromSd.py
import glob
import os

from canlib import EAN, VersionNumber
from canlib import kvmlib

# Our SD card is mounted under J:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = 'J:/LOG00000.KMF'

# Directory to put the resulting files in
resultDir = "result"

# Make sure the result directory exists and is empty
if os.path.isdir(resultDir):
    files = glob.glob(os.path.join(resultDir, "*"))
    for f in files:
        os.remove(f)
else:
    os.mkdir(resultDir)
os.chdir(resultDir)

# Open the SD card
# We have earlier verified that the SD card is using Lio Data Format v5.0
# and we should use kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT as the deviceType
with kvmlib.openKmf(filename) as kmf:
    ldf_version = kmf.log.ldf_version
    # Verify that the LIO data format of the card corresponds to
    # the device type we used when opening the device
    if ldf_version != VersionNumber(major=5, minor=0):
        if ldf_version == VersionNumber(major=3, minor=0):
            raise ValueError('This log file can be read if you reopen the'
                             ' device as kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA.')
        raise ValueError('Unexpected Lio Data Format: ' + str(ldf_version))

    # Read number of recorded logfiles
    num_log_files = len(kmf.log)
    print("Found {num} file on card: ".format(num=num_log_files))

    # Loop through all logfiles and write their contents to .kme50 files
    for i, log_file in enumerate(kmf.log):
        print("\n==== File {index}: {start} - {end}, approx {num} events".
              format(index=i,
                     start=log_file.start_time,
                     end=log_file.end_time,
                     num=log_file.event_count_estimation()))
        # The first logEvent contains device information
        event_iterator = iter(log_file)
        first_event = next(event_iterator)
        ean = EAN.from_hilo([first_event.eanHi, first_event.eanLo])
        serial = first_event.serialNumber
        # Add EAN and serial number info to filename
        logfile_name = ('log_{ean}_{sn}_{index:03}.kme50'.
                        format(ean=str(ean), sn=serial, index=i))
        print('Saving to:', logfile_name)
        with kvmlib.createKme(logfile_name) as kme:
            print(first_event)
            kme.write_event(first_event)
            for event in event_iterator:
                # Write event to stdout
                print(event)
                kme.write_event(event)

    # Delete all logfiles
    # kmf.log.delete_all()

Listing 18: Read logged data from SD card and save to .kme50 files.

Running the above code we can see that six messages from each channel turns up inside the log.

Found 1 file on card:

==== File 0: 2018-08-10 12:26:38 - 2018-08-10 12:26:44, approx 20 events
Saving to: log_73-30130-00819-9_11573_000.kme50
*t:             - EAN:73-30130-00819-9  s/n:11573  FW:v3.11.557  LIO:v5.0
 t:   2.701738275  DateTime: 2018-08-10 12:26:38
 t:   2.701738275 Log Trigger Event (type: 0x2, trigno: 0x01, pre-trigger: 0, post-trigger: 0)

 t:   2.701738275  ch:1 f:    2 id:   3 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   2.701738337 Log Trigger Event (type: 0x2, trigno: 0x01, pre-trigger: 0, post-trigger: 0)

 t:   2.701738337  ch:0 f:   42 id:   3 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:     3.7017584  ch:1 f:    2 id:   4 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   3.701758462  ch:0 f:   42 id:   4 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   4.701774525  ch:1 f:    2 id:   5 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   4.701774587  ch:0 f:   42 id:   5 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:    5.70179165 Log Trigger Event (type: 0x2, trigno: 0x01, pre-trigger: 0, post-trigger: 2500)

 t:    5.70179165  ch:1 f:    2 id:   6 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   5.701791712  ch:0 f:   42 id:   6 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   6.701809775  ch:1 f:    2 id:   7 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   6.701809837  ch:0 f:   42 id:   7 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:     7.7018359  ch:1 f:    2 id:   8 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15
 t:   7.701835962  ch:0 f:   42 id:   8 dlc: 8 d:12 21 13 31 22 34 41 15

4.4 Read configuration from SD card

For completeness, the only thing left is to show how to read back our compressed configuration that we placed on the SD card earlier using the Windows mount point.

# 16_readConfigFromSd.py
import glob
import os
import shutil

# Our SD card is mounted under J:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = 'J:/LOG00000.KMF'

for file in glob.glob(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(filename), "*.*")):
    if(os.path.splitext(file)[1].lower() == '.kmf'
       or file.lower() == 'param.lif'
       or file.lower() == 'database.bin'):
        print('Skipping:', file)
    else:
        print('Copying:', file)
        shutil.copy(file, ".")

Listing 19: Copy of all user files from the SD card.

Now everything from this run is placed inside the result directory.

C:> dir result

 Directory of result

2018-08-10  13:28             2 516 config.zip
2018-08-10  13:28        10 010 624 DATABASE.BIN
2018-08-10  13:16               452 log_73-30130-00819-9_11573_000.kme50
2018-08-10  13:28            40 604 PARAM.LIF
               4 File(s)     10 054 196 bytes
               2 Dir(s)  786 525 990 912 bytes free

This was all for now, hopefully this blog series has helped you getting to know more about kvmlib and showed what the library can do for you when managing Kvaser logger devices.

Footnotes

1 Default installation location form Kvaser Memorator Config Tool is

 C:\Program Files (x86)\Kvaser\MemoratorConfigTool\mhydraformat.exe

2 We only supply the filename for the first of the log file container files, as the rest will follow immediately after this first file on the card.



This article has been updated. To view the original, click on the box below.

Original Article

Original article published April 19, 2016.

This blog uses now deprecated functions, see blog “Improved API in Python canlib v1.5” for more information.

This is the final post in a 4-part series about configuring and reading logged data using a Kvaser Memorator 2nd Generation device through kvmlib:

Earlier we interacted with kvmlib to configure a device and to retrieve both the configuration and logged data for further analysis. Now we will look at what steps that need to be performed differently if we only have access to the SD card that will be inserted into the device. The scenario is where the SD card is shipped between the physical logging location and us.

For the purpose of this exercise, we will take a 16 GB SD card that has been formatted in Windows, initialize and configure this SD card so that we later can insert the SD card into our Kvaser Memorator Pro 5xHS (EAN 00778-9), which is running firmware version 3.0. After running our logging session, we will remove the SD card from the device, read and reset the log files. Full program listings are available on GitHub.

Update 2017-03-21: Updated sample code to work with Python 3 as well as using the Python canlib package introduced in CANlib SDK v5.17.

Update 2017-03-28: Added the now preferred usage of kmfWriteConfig() over letting kvaXmlToFile() write directly to the SD Card.

4.1 Initialize SD card

If you do not have your device at hand, you can still initialize the SD card using your computer and the mhydraformat.exe program. This will however be more time consuming than using the device, as initializing a 16 GB card takes approximately 3 minutes.

The mhydraformat.exe program can be found in the installation directory of Kvaser Memorator Config Tool.1 You can run the formatting program with the –help argument to see the usage help text.

[C:\]mhydraformat.exe --help
Disk formatting program for Kvaser Memorator (2nd generation) devices.
-h       --help            | Print this information.
-d=DRIVE --drive=DRIVE     | The drive to format, e.g. F:
-r=X     --reserve=X       | The number of MB to reserve for user files.
-c=X     --config=X        | The number of MB to reserve for configurations.
         --fat16           | Format the disk with FAT16. Default is FAT32.
-i       --interactive     | Require the user to confirm before format.
-q       --quiet           | Stop all outputs. Overrides -i.
         --bin5            | Use the older, smaller version 5 of PARAM.LIF.
         --lio3            | Use the older LIO data format 3 for KMF files.

Example:
         mhydraformat -d=F: -r=100 -c=10 --interactive

Connect your SD card to the computer and note the drive letter. For me, the SD card was assigned to E:. After inspecting the contents of the SD card, we run mhydraformat.exe to initialize the card. Note that the command line switch to specify the space to be allocated to DATABASE.BIN is here named –config. We also take a look at the contents of the card after the initialization using the Windows dir command.

dir E:
 Volume in drive E has no label.
 Volume Serial Number is 5C92-4738

 Directory of E:\

2016-02-23 08:41                  0 dummy_file
              1 File(s)               0 bytes
              0 Dir(s)   16 129 335 296 bytes free
mhydraformat.exe -d=E: -r=10000 -c=10
Formatting...done.
dir E:
 Volume in drive E has no label.

 Directory of E:\

2016-02-23 08:45 10 485 760 PARAM.LIF
2016-02-23 08:45 1 073 741 824 LOG00000.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 1 073 741 824 LOG00001.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 1 073 741 824 LOG00002.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 1 073 741 824 LOG00003.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 1 073 741 824 LOG00004.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 736 649 216 LOG00005.KMF
2016-02-23 08:45 10 010 624 DATABASE.BIN
8 File(s) 6 125 854 720 bytes
0 Dir(s) 10 004 480 000 bytes free
echo
ECHO is on.

Here we see the binary configuration file (PARAM.LIF), the log file container (LOG00000.KMF through LOG00005.KMF) and the configuration file reserved for Kvaser Memorator Config Tool (10 MB DATABASE.BIN). We also see 10000 MB of free space as we requested.

4.2 Save configuration to disk

To download the configuration directly to the SD card, we need to open the file system instead of the device as we did in one of the previous posts. We also need to inform kvmlib about where our SD card was mounted. This is done by calling the function kmfOpen() and supply the full path to the file LOG00000.KMF, which always exists on a correctly initialized SD card.2

We are now also using kvaMemoLibXml to write the binary configuration file directly to the SD card.

As previously stated we also need to supply the correct device type.

import canlib.kvaMemoLibXml as kvaMemoLibXml
import canlib.kvmlib as kvmlib

# Our SD card is mounted under E:, so that is where our
# binary configuration should be placed.
kmfFilename = "E:\\LOG00000.KMF"

ml = kvmlib.kvmlib()
xl = kvaMemoLibXml.kvaMemoLibXml()
print("kvaMemoLibXml version: v%s" % xl.getVersion())

# Convert the previously validated XML configuration file
# and write the resulting binary configuration to SD card
# It is no longer recommended to write directly to the SD Card
# using kvaXmlToFile() but use the kmfWriteConfig()
# function instead.

with open("config.xml", 'r') as myfile:
    configXml = myfile.read()

try:
    # Convert the previously validated XML configuration file
    configBuf = xl.kvaXmlToBuffer(configXml)
except kvaMemoLibXml.kvaError:
    print("Error in configuration.")
    exit(1)

try:
    # Write the resulting binary configuration to SD card
    deviceType = kvmlib.kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT
    ml.kmfOpen(filename=kmfFilename, deviceType=deviceType)
    ml.kmfWriteConfig(configBuf)
    ml.close
except kvmlib.kvmDiskNotFormated:
    print("SD card is not initialized.")
    exit(1)

Listing 18: Writing binary configuration to SD card.

To download the configuration in clear text, we do just like we did in the previous post, but write the zip file to the SD card directly through the Windows mount point.

import zipfile
 
# Our SD card is mounted under E:
filename = "E:\\config.zip"

# Creating zip archive
with zipfile.ZipFile(filename, mode='w',
                     compression=zipfile.ZIP_DEFLATED) as zipf:
    # Adding files to zip archive
    zipf.write("config.xml")
    zipf.write("myCanGenerator.txe")

Listing 19: Writing clear text configurations using a zip archive.

If we now look at the contents of our SD card we have the following.

d:\temp\blog>dir E:
 Volume in drive E has no label.

 Directory of E:\

2016-02-19 07:58 40 308 PARAM.LIF
2016-02-11 14:43 1 073 741 824 LOG00000.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 1 073 741 824 LOG00001.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 1 073 741 824 LOG00002.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 1 073 741 824 LOG00003.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 1 073 741 824 LOG00004.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 744 030 208 LOG00005.KMF
2016-02-11 14:43 10 002 432 DATABASE.BIN
2016-02-19 10:10 2 406 config.zip
              9 File(s) 6 122 784 474 bytes
              0 Dir(s) 10 010 435 584 bytes free

4.3 Read result from SD card

When we get the SD card back from the field, we reconnect the SD card to our computer and begin by verifying the LIO data format version on the SD card.

import canlib.kvmlib as kvmlib

ml = kvmlib.kvmlib()

# Our SD card is mounted under E:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = "E:\\LOG00000.KMF"

try:
    # Open the SD card
    # We have firmware version 3.0 in the device this SD card will
    # be inserted into, this means that the FW is using Lio Data
    # Format v5.0 and we should use kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT as
    # the deviceType
    lioDataFormat = ml.kmfOpenEx(filename,
                                 deviceType=kvmlib.kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT)
    print("Lio Data Format v%s" % lioDataFormat)

    # Close SD card
    ml.close()

    # Verify that the LIO data format of the card corresponds to
    # the device type we used when opening the device
    if lioDataFormat != '5.0':
        print("Unexpected Lio Data Format:", lioDataFormat)
        if lioDataFormat == '3.0':
            print("This log file can be read if you reopen the"
                  " device as kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA.")
        exit(1)
except kvmlib.kvmDiskNotFormated:
    print("SD card is not initialized...")
    exit(1)

Listing 20: Verify LIO data format on SD card.

The next step is to read out the logged data. The only difference from our previous post using a connected device is opening the SD card instead of the device. Go back to the previous post for a more detailed description of what happens here.

import glob
import os

import canlib.kvmlib as kvmlib

ml = kvmlib.kvmlib()

# Our SD card is mounted under E:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = "E:\\LOG00000.KMF"

# Directory to put the resulting files in
resultDir = "result"

# Make sure the result directory exists and is empty
if os.path.isdir(resultDir):
    files = glob.glob(os.path.join(resultDir, "*"))
    for f in files:
        os.remove(f)
else:
    os.mkdir(resultDir)
os.chdir(resultDir)

# Open the SD card
# We have earlier verified that the SD card is using Lio Data Format v5.0
# and we should use kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT as the deviceType
ml.kmfOpen(filename, deviceType=kvmlib.kvmDEVICE_MHYDRA_EXT)

# Read number of recorded logfiles
fileCount = ml.logFileGetCount()
print("Found %d file%s on card:" % (fileCount,
                                    "s" if fileCount > 1 else ""))

# Loop through all logfiles and write their contents to .kme50 files
for fileIndx in range(fileCount):
    eventCount = ml.logFileMount(fileIndx)
    print("\tFile %3d: %10d events" % (fileIndx, eventCount))
    logEvent = ml.logFileReadEventLogFormat()

    # The first logEvent contains device information
    memoEvent = logEvent.createMemoEvent()
    sn = memoEvent.serialNumber
    ean_lo = memoEvent.eanLo
    ean_sn = "%05x-%x_%d" % ((ean_lo >> 4) & 0xfffff, ean_lo & 0xf, sn)

    # Add EAN and serial number info to filename
    logfileName = "log_%s_%d.kme50" % (ean_sn, fileIndx)
    ml.kmeCreateFile(logfileName, kvmlib.kvmFILE_KME50)
    while logEvent is not None:
        # Write event to stdout
        print(logEvent)
        ml.kmeWriteEvent(logEvent)
        # Read next event
        logEvent = ml.logFileReadEventLogFormat()
    ml.kmeCloseFile()

# Delete all logfiles
ml.logFileDeleteAll()

# Close device
ml.close()

Listing 21: Read logged data from SD card and save to .kme50 files.

4.4 Read configuration from SD card

For completeness, the only thing left is to show how to read back our compressed configuration that we placed on the SD card earlier using the Windows mount point.

import glob
import os
import shutil

# Our SD card is mounted under E:, so our LOG00000.KMF can
# be opened from here
filename = "E:\\LOG00000.KMF"

for file in glob.glob(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(filename), "*")):
    if(os.path.splitext(file)[1].lower() == '.kmf'
       or file.lower() == 'param.lif'
       or file.lower() == 'database.bin'):
        print("Skipping %s" % file)
    else:
        print("Copying %s" % file)
        shutil.copy(file, ".")

Listing 22: Copy of all user files from the SD card.

Copying E:\\PARAM.LIF
Skipping E:\\LOG00000.KMF
Skipping E:\\LOG00001.KMF
Skipping E:\\LOG00002.KMF
Skipping E:\\LOG00003.KMF
Skipping E:\\LOG00004.KMF
Skipping E:\\LOG00005.KMF
Copying E:\\DATABASE.BIN
Copying E:\\config.zip

Now everything from this run is placed inside the result directory.

d:\temp\blog>dir result
 Volume in drive D is HDD
 Volume Serial Number is 26E3-B474

 Directory of d:\temp\blog\result

2016-02-22 16:06     <DIR>          .
2016-02-22 16:06     <DIR>          ..
2016-02-22 16:06              2 406 CONFIG.ZIP
2016-02-22 16:06         10 002 432 DATABASE.BIN
2016-02-22 16:06             40 308 PARAM.LIF
              3 File(s)      10 045 146 bytes
              2 Dir(s)   961 850 183 680 bytes free

d:\temp\blog>More?

This was all for now, hopefully this blog series has helped you getting to know more about kvmlib and showed what the library can do for you when managing Kvaser logger devices.

Footnotes

1 Default installation location form Kvaser Memorator Config Tool is

 C:\Program Files (x86)\Kvaser\MemoratorConfigTool\mhydraformat.exe

2 We only supply the filename for the first of the log file container files, as the rest will follow immediately after this first file on the card.

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Magnus Carlsson

Magnus Carlsson is a Software Developer for Kvaser AB and has developed firmware and software for Kv...